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Dr. Alexander Smith- ICAN speaker

Date:
October 01, 2018
Time:
11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Event Category:
Seminars
Location:
Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Organizer:
Neurobiology and Behavior
Email:

ICAN SEMINAR
Monday, October 1st, 2018
11AM, Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory (Building 506 on the campus map)

Alexander Smith, Ph.D
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

“Biochemical and Genetic Regulation of Plasticity Underlying Cue-Induced Reinstatement”

Abstract:
Addiction is a major health concern, and preventing relapse is perhaps the most difficult aspect in providing treatment. Despite distinct pharmacological mechanisms of action, all addictive drugs produce similar behavioral endpoints, including relapse that can be induced by drug-associated cues. Similarly, while different classes of drugs produce differing, sometimes opposite, constitutive effects on brain physiology, relapse to all addictive drugs is characterized by transient synaptic potentiation of corticostriatal synapses in the nucleus accumbens core (NAcore). Thus, I propose that the most promising pharmacotherapeutic targets for prevention of relapse are those that are similarly altered across classes of drugs. In this seminar, I will present data showing that cue-induced reinstatement to heroin, cocaine, and nicotine each require activation of the extracellular matrix-remodeling enzyme MMP-9. I will then present unpublished work examining the regulation of cue-induced reinstatement, and MMP-9 activity by two microRNAs: miR-132 and miR-212. Finally, I will discuss plans for the near future to perform brain-wide examination of shared neurobiological substrates of opiate and psychostimulant relapse.

Alberto Lopez- Dissertation Defense 8/27/18 @3PM

Date:
August 27, 2018
Time:
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Event Category:
Dissertation
Location:
Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Organizer:
Neurobiology and Behavior
Email:

DEPARTMENT OF NEUROBIOLOGY & BEHAVIOR
Ph.D. DISSERTATION DEFENSE
****************************************
Alberto Lopez
Dr. Wood’s Lab

Epigenetic control of medial habenula function in cocaine-associated behaviors

 

Monday, August  27th, 2018
@3:00PM


Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory

UC Irvine Center for Addiction Neuroscience Annual Symposium

Date:
June 12, 2018
Time:
7:45 am - 5:30 pm
Event Category:
Seminars
Location:
Crystal Cove Auditorium, UCI Conference Center, 4113 Pereira Drive, Irvine CA 92617
Organizer:
Neurobiology and Behavior
Email:

The Department of Neurobiology & Behavior and the School of Biological Sciences would like to cordially invite you to the annual UC Irvine Center for Addiction Neuroscience (ICAN) Symposium .

Space is limited, so please RSVP at your earliest convenience at http://irvinecan.com/registration/

As a quick reference, details of the symposium are below:

Event:                                 UC Irvine Center for Addiction Neuroscience (ICAN) Symposium

Date:                                   Tuesday, June 12, 2018

Time:                                  7:45am – 5:30pm

Location:                            Crystal Cove Auditorium, UCI Conference Center, 4113 Pereira Drive, Irvine CA 92617

Website:                             http://irvinecan.com/

Registration Deadline:    Friday, June 1st, 2018

 

Caitlin Askew-Dissertation Defense

Date:
June 01, 2018
Time:
10:00 am - 11:00 am
Event Category:
Dissertation
Location:
Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Organizer:
Naima Louridi
Email:

DEPARTMENT OF NEUROBIOLOGY & BEHAVIOR
Ph.D. DISSERTATION DEFENSE
****************************************
Caitlin Askew
Dr. Metherate’s Lab

 

Nicotine’s effects on auditory processing and the role of cortical interneurons

 

Friday, June  1st, 2018
@10:00AM


Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory

 

 

Kyle Ellefsen- Dissertation Defense

Date:
May 16, 2018
Time:
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Event Category:
Dissertation
Location:
Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory (Building 506 on the campus map)
Organizer:
Neurobiology and Behavior
Email:

DEPARTMENT OF NEUROBIOLOGY & BEHAVIOR
Ph.D. DISSERTATION DEFENSE
****************************************
Kyle Ellefsen
Dr. Parker’s Lab

Spatiotemporal organization of cellular machinery underlying calcium signaling

 

Wednesday, May 16th, 2018
@2:00PM


Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory

 

Dr. Ian Maze- Seminar

Date:
April 24, 2018
Time:
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Event Category:
Seminars
Location:
Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory (Building 506 on the campus map)
Organizer:
Neurobiology and Behavior
Email:

Neurobiology and Behavior Seminar

Tuesday, April 24th, 2018

11 AM, Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory (Building 506 on the campus map)

 

Ian Maze, PhD

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Departments of Neuroscience and Pharmacological Sciences

 

Aberrant histone dopaminylation in the ventral tegmental area promotes relapse to cocaine

 

Abstract:

Drug abuse is characterized by loss of control over drug intake, as well as persistent drug-seeking behaviors, despite negative consequences to both the drug abuser and those directly affected by their behavior. Given that drug addicts continue to crave and pursue drugs of abuse following extended periods of abstinence and/or treatment indicates that life-long changes in brain may occur to promote these behavioral phenotypes. Persistent changes in neuronal gene expression are known to promote physiological alterations implicated in drug addiction. More recently, cell-type and brain region specific epigenetic mechanisms have also been demonstrated to regulate transcriptional programs contributing to addictive-like behaviors; however, our understanding of how these mechanisms mediate life-long addiction remains limited. Dopaminergic neurotransmission in the central nervous system plays a critical role in psychostimulant-induced neural plasticity, with alterations in dopamine production/function being implicated in both the development and treatment of substance use disorders. Although packaging of dopamine by the vesicular monoamine transporter is essential for numerous aspects of reward, recent data have demonstrated the additional presence of ‘reserve’ pools of extravesicular monoamines in the nucleus of monoamine producing neurons. Dopamine, as well as other monoamines, has previously been shown to form covalent bonds with certain cytoplasmic proteins catalyzed by the tissue Transglutaminase 2 enzyme. Our laboratory has recently identified histone proteins as robust substrates for dopaminylation in vivo, specifically on histone 3 glutamine 5 (H3Q5dop). In addition, our data demonstrate that chronic withdrawal from volitional administration of extended access cocaine in rodents results in high levels of dopamine accumulation in the nucleus of dopamine producing neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), and a robust increase in histone dopaminylation. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that inhibiting dopaminylation in VTA–which, in turn, attenuates cocaine-induced increases in striatal dopamine release dynamics–is sufficient to block cocaine-seeking behaviors following periods of extended withdrawal without impairing reinforcement by nature rewards (e.g., food). Taken together, these potentially paradigm-shifting studies will aid in our understanding as to how monoamines, specifically dopamine, function in brain to regulate neurotransmission-independent neuronal plasticity and cocaine-mediated behaviors.

Dr. Kyle Smith- ICAN SEMINAR

Date:
April 16, 2018
Time:
3PM - 4PM
Event Category:
Seminars
Location:
Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory (Building 506 on the campus map)
Email:

ICAN SEMINAR

Monday, April 16th, 2018

3PM, Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory (Building 506 on the campus map)

 

Kyle Smith, Ph.D

Dartmouth College

 

“Brain mechanisms for reward cue attraction”

 

Abstract:

Cues that predict reward engage reward seeking behaviors.  They can also acquire their own motivational properties, capturing attention and triggering approach and interaction with the cue itself.  I will discuss some recent studies on both processes – cue-triggered reward behavior and cue-directed behavior – with a focus on how they relate to interactions between regions of the nucleus accumbens and ventral pallidum.  The results of this work suggest that both forms of behavior rely on accumbens-pallidum circuitry, yet they can be dissociated.  One surprising finding is that, whereas accumbens-pallidum connections promote cue-triggered reward seeking, these connections may functionally oppose an attraction to the cues themselves.  Finally, data will also be shown that suggest the attraction to cues can be flexible yet also powerfully enduring in a manner that is reminiscent of cue reactivity in addiction.

 

Terra White Dissertation Defense

Date:
March 12, 2018
Time:
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Event Category:
Dissertation
Location:
Herklotz Conference Room, Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Organizer:
Neurobiology and Behavior
Email:

DEPARTMENT OF NEUROBIOLOGY & BEHAVIOR
Ph.D. DISSERTATION DEFENSE
****************************************
Terra White
Dr. Guzowski’s Lab

Neuroimmune Modulation of Memory: From Genes and Neural Circuit Activity to Behavior

 Monday, March 12th, 2018
@2:00PM


Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory

Abstract:

Peripheral immune activation can affect cognitive function, including memory. While prior studies have examined how immune stimulation affects neuronal function or performance in memory tasks, there is a lack of research directly linking molecular and neural circuit alterations to behavioral impairment. This dissertation investigates effects of acute immune challenge on memory with a systematic approach that connects molecular mechanisms, neural circuit activity, and behavior within a consistent rodent experimental model. During this seminar, I will describe specific memory deficits observed during acute neuroinflammation and accompanying alterations of neural circuit activity and gene expression patterns in the hippocampus. Bioinformatic analyses were performed to generate predictive models linking immune gene expression to changes in neural/synaptic gene expression, neural circuit activity, and memory performance. Collectively, this research provided novel insights into interactions between the immune and nervous systems that modulate neuronal circuit activity critical for hippocampus-dependent contextual memory function. Moreover, statistical modeling results identified key synaptic genes associated with memory impairment and circuit activity dysregulation during neuroinflammatory challenge. This work will facilitate future translational studies aimed towards developing therapies that ameliorate the negative impacts of inflammation on memory.

Dr. Gina Turrigiano- SEMINAR

Date:
February 06, 2018
Time:
11:00AM - 12:00PM
Event Category:
Seminars
Location:
Herklotz Conference Room, Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Organizer:
Neurobiology and Behavior
Email:

Neurobiology and Behavior Seminar

Tuesday, February 6th, 2018

11 AM, Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory (Building 506 on the campus map)

Gina Turrigiano, PhD

Brandeis University

“Self-Tuning Neurons and Firing Rate Homeostasis”

Abstract:

Neocortical networks must generate and maintain stable activity patterns despite perturbations induced by learning and experience- dependent plasticity. There is abundant theoretical and experimental evidence that network stability is achieved through homeostatic plasticity mechanisms that adjust synaptic and neuronal properties to stabilize some measure of average activity, and this process has been extensively studied in primary visual cortex (V1), where chronic visual deprivation induces an initial drop in activity and ensemble average firing rates (FRs), but over time activity is restored to baseline despite continued deprivation. Here I discuss recent work from the lab in which we followed this FR homeostasis in individual V1 neurons in freely behaving animals during a prolonged visual deprivation/eye-reopening paradigm. We find that – when FRs are perturbed by manipulating sensory experience – over time they return precisely to a cell-autonomous set-point.   Finally, we find that homeostatic plasticity is perturbed in a mouse model of Autism spectrum disorder, and this results in a breakdown of FRH within V1. These data suggest that loss of homeostatic plasticity is one primary cause of excitation/inhibition imbalances and microcircuit disfunction in ASD models.

 

Dr. Jeremy Day-Seminar

Date:
September 26, 2017
Time:
11:00AM - 12:00PM
Event Category:
Seminars
Location:
Herklotz Conference Room, Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Organizer:
ICAN and Anatomy & Neurobiology
Email:

Jeremy Day, Ph.D

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Title: Control-alter-delete: Epigenetic regulation in neuronal system

Date: Tuesday, September 26th, 2017

Time: 11AM

Location: Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory

 

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