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Seminar Dr. Majid Mohajerani

Date:
April 19, 2019
Time:
11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Event Category:
Seminars
Location:
Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Organizer:
Neurobiology and Behavior
Email:

Neurobiology and Behavior Seminar

Friday, April 19th, 2019

11 AM, Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory (Building 506 on the campus map)

 

Majid Mohajerani, PhD

University of Lethbridge

 

Probing the spatiotemporal dynamics of hippocampal-cortical dialogue in health and Alzheimer’s disease

 

Abstract:

In my talk, I will provide new information regarding the interaction of hippocampus (HPC) and neocortex (NC) during sleep. Although evidence indicates that episodic memories are formed through a functional coupling between hippocampal and cortical network activity, how they interact to subserve a transfer of information is less clear. To provide new insight regarding the interaction of HPC and NC during sleep, we have combined novel imaging technologies with genetic, molecular and electrophysiological techniques to interrogate the cortical circuits at the level of individual synapses and function with millisecond temporal resolution across the entire cortex with information from the hippocampus. Further, I will discuss our effort to monitor how HPC output to NC is altered in the mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease.

Dr. Xiao-Jiang Li Talk

Date:
March 14, 2019
Time:
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Event Category:
Seminars
Location:
Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Organizer:
Neurobiology and Behavior
Email:

Xiao-Jiang Li, PhD

Emory University

Title: Genetically modified animal models revealing species-dependent neuropathology in brain diseases

 Date: Thursday, March 14, 2019

Time: 4PM

Location: Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory

 

Abstract: Using genetic modifications of different species (mouse, pig, and non-human primates) to model neurological disorders, we found species-dependent neuropathology. In particular, Huntington disease knock-in pigs show selective and overt neurodegeneration, which is seen in the brains of Huntington patients but not in Huntington disease mouse models. The species-dependent neuropathology provides important insights into the selective neurodegeneration in age-dependent neurodegenerative diseases and paves an avenue to identify therapeutic targets.

Dr. Thomas Lane Talk

Date:
March 11, 2019
Time:
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Event Category:
Seminars
Location:
Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Organizer:
Neurobiology and Behavior
Email:

Thomas Lane, PhD

University of Utah

Title: Innate immune responses contribute to host defense, disease and repair in a model of viral-induced neurologic disease

 Date: Monday, March 11, 2019

Time: 4PM

Location: Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory

 

Abstract: Viral infection of the central nervous system (CNS) results in a number of different clinical outcomes ranging from benign infection to life-threatening conditions as well as insidious disease characterized by viral persistence with potential for life-long neurological complications. Importantly, the past 20 years has recognized the emergence of neurotropic viruses that have caused a myriad of clinical problems and raised public awareness of the importance of studying viruses that infect the CNS.  We employ infection of susceptible mice with the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV) to better understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms influencing host defense, demyelination, and remyelination. While the adaptive immune response is critical in effectively controlling viral replication as well as driving white matter demyelination, the contributions of the innate immune response to these processes is less well understood. We have recently determined that microglia are critical in enhancing host defense following JHMV infection as well as restricting the severity of demyelination by influencing the immunological landscape within the CNS. Moreover, sustained neutrophil infiltration into the CNS of JHMV-infected mice leads to increased demyelination through mechanisms that may include release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and reactive nitrogen/oxygen species. Finally, we have identified an important chemokine signaling pathway that influences maturation of oligodendroglia into mature myelin-producing oligodendrocytes and this influences remyelination in JHMV-infected mice. Collectively, these findings may offer insight into new strategies to develop novel therapies that impede disease progression and promote repair.

Dr. Malu Tansey- Seminar

Date:
February 14, 2019
Time:
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Event Category:
Seminars
Location:
Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Organizer:
Neurobiology and Behavior
Email:

Malu Tansey, PhD

Emory University

Title: The Role of LRRK2 in Immune and Inflammatory Mechanisms in the Gut-Brain Axis

 Date: Thursday, February 14th, 2019

Time: 4PM

Location: Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory

Abstract: Links between Parkinson’s disease and the gastrointestinal system have become increasingly common. Mutations in the gene encoding Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2 (LRRK2) are known as the greatest genetic contributor to Parkinson’s disease (PD), but may account for as much as 2% of sporadic PD, and increased risk for Crohn’s disease. G2019S, the most common LRRK2-inherited PD mutation, results in increased kinase activity and is weakly associated with risk for Crohn’s disease. The LRRK2 N2081D SNP is associated with a two-fold higher risk for Crohn’s disease and results in a similar gain-of-function increase in kinase activity as G2019S. We have been investigating the role of LRRK2 in immune cells and in the gut-brain axis within the context of PD pathogenesis.

Published studies from our lab revealed that human peripheral blood immune cells express detectable LRRK2 protein and individuals with sporadic PD have increased levels of total LRRK2 protein that correlates with heightened inflammatory responses. To investigate the functional significance of these findings, we used BAC transgenic mice overexpressing wildtype or G2019S mouse LRRK2 and investigated their peripheral immune cell profiles as a function of age and in response to various immunological challenges and their ability to recover from acute DSS-induced colitis as well as the effects of these peripheral inflammatory insults on the brain. Completion of these studies will advance our understanding of the role of LRRK2 in regulating immune and inflammatory responses in peripheral organs, including the gut, that have the potential to impact brain inflammation, neuronal function, and vulnerability to age-related neurodegenerative diseases like PD.

Dr. Mark Schnitzer- Seminar

Date:
February 08, 2019
Time:
11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Event Category:
Seminars
Location:
Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Organizer:
Neurobiology and Behavior
Email:

Neurobiology and Behavior Seminar

Friday, February 8th, 2019

11 AM, Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory (Building 506 on the campus map)

 

Mark Schnitzer, PhD

Stanford University

 

“Illuminating brain circuits in action in health and disease”

 

Abstract:

Optical techniques have become central to research at the forefront of brain science and are still rapidly increasing in their breadth and importance to the field. For example, the U.S. BRAIN Initiative has as one of its priorities the aim of fostering continued innovation in this domain. I will present recent advances in optical brain imaging, which have allowed the visualization of large-scale neural codes in behaving animals, as well as optical readouts of neuronal voltage oscillations. In particular, I will discuss the miniature integrated microscope and a recent application of this technology to the study of Parkinson’s disease and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Emerging innovations in optical brain imaging are providing new glimpses into how multiple brain areas work together to coordinate mammalian behavior and are likely to yield improved understanding of both healthy and diseased brains.

 

Dr. Rebecca M. Shansky- Seminar

Date:
January 22, 2019
Time:
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Event Category:
Seminars
Location:
Telemedicine Theather B001 Medical Education Building
Organizer:
Conte Center @UCI
Phone:
949-824-6478
Email:

Conte Center@UCI  SEMINAR

Tuesday, January 22, 2018

4:00PM, Telemedicine theater B001 Medical Education Building

 

Rebecca M. Shansky, Ph.D

Northeaster University

 

“Sex differences in fear processing

Host: Professor Tallie Z. Baram

 

Co-Sponsored by the UCI Department of Neurobiology & Behavior and the UCI Center for the Neurobiology of Learning & Memory

Contact: Dina Jankowski, (949)824-6478 or djankows@uci.edu

Dr. Ida Momennejad- TALK

Date:
December 19, 2018
Time:
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Event Category:
Seminars
Location:
Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Organizer:
Neurobiology and Behavior
Email:

Ida Momennejad, PhD

Princeton University

Title: Multi-scale Predictive Representations in Memory and Planning

Date: Wednesday, December 19th, 2018

Time: 10AM

Location: Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory

 

Abstract:

How does the brain build models of the world in order to predict and plan the future?  Tolman proposed cognitive maps that represent merely relationships between adjacent events in the environment.  When faced with a decision, the one-step cognitive map would be used to simulate various paths to reward ‘online’, step-by-step.  However, this proposal is computationally costly and inefficient for realistically large decision trees.  An alternative proposal is that an efficient model of the environment generalizes multi-step structural relationships among states or events.  Such a model can be updated by ‘offline’ memory processes; enabling fast and flexible planning.  I use reinforcement learning, behavioral experiments, fMRI, and electrophysiology in humans to study how the brain maps the world.  I show evidence that multi-step predictive representations, abstracted at multiple scales and updated via replay, govern planning behavior.  These multi-scale maps are supported by the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex, which also support non-spatial prospective memory and predictive representations.  I will briefly discuss ongoing work in human electrophysiology and computational psychiatry.  Taken together, this work suggests that multi-scale predictive representations may underlie memory, navigation, and planning.

Dr. James Antony- Talk

Date:
December 18, 2018
Time:
11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Event Category:
Seminars
Location:
Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Organizer:
Neurobiology and Behavior
Email:

James Antony, PhD

Princeton University

Title: How memories endure: memory reactivation during sleep and wake

Date: Tuesday, December 18th, 2018

Time: 11AM

Location: Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory

Abstract:

Memories change over time, as some of their features become weaker (forgetting) and others become stronger (consolidation). In this talk, I will investigate how long-term memory change is modulated by reactivation during sleep and wake. First, I will focus on a technique that involves presenting learning-related stimuli during sleep (termed targeted memory reactivation, or TMR). My findings show that TMR benefits memory retention for numerous types of memory. Crucially, they also point to a specific physiological process – the sleep spindle – that is essential for optimal memory reactivation during sleep. Next, I will present a theoretical framework that addresses how retrieval (vs. restudy) affects the neurobiological underpinnings of long-term memory; I will present results that support this framework as well as future plans for testing the framework. Last, I will discuss a separate line of work asking how individual episodes become abstracted into gist-based representations in a spatial domain, including results from a neuroimaging study that uses a virtual reality environment to reconstruct memory for locations. Cumulatively, these findings significantly contribute to understanding how reactivation benefits and shapes memory consolidation.

 

Dr. Elizabeth Chrastil- Talk

Date:
December 17, 2018
Time:
11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Event Category:
Seminars
Location:
Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Organizer:
Neurobiology and Behavior
Email:

Elizabeth Chrastil, PhD

University California, Santa Barbara

Title: Using spatial navigation to understand human learning and memory

 Date: Monday, December 17th, 2018

Time: 11AM

Location: Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory

Abstract:

Navigation is a central part of daily life. For some, getting around is easy, while others struggle, and certain clinical populations display wandering behaviors and extensive disorientation. Working at the interface between immersive virtual reality and neuroimaging techniques, my research uses these complementary approaches to inform questions about how we acquire and use spatial knowledge. In this talk, I will discuss both some of my recent work and upcoming experiments that center on three main themes: 1) how we learn new environments, 2) how the brain tracks spatial information, and 3) how individuals differ in their spatial abilities. More broadly, I will discuss how navigation lends insight into processes of human learning and memory. The behavioral and neuroimaging studies presented in this talk inform new frameworks for understanding spatial knowledge, leading to novel approaches to answering the next major questions in navigation, learning, and memory.

Dr. Subhojit Roy- TALK

Date:
December 14, 2018
Time:
11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Event Category:
Seminars
Location:
Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Organizer:
Neurobiology & Behavior, Pathology
Email:

SPECIAL SEMINAR

 Subhojit Roy, MD, PhD

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Title: Neuronal Trafficking in Physiology and Disease

Date: Friday, December 14th, 2018

Time: 11AM

Location: Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory

Abstract:  Due to their complex geometry and finite sites of bulk protein synthesis (perikarya), neurons have evolved elaborate transport and trafficking machineries to deliver proteins into axons and dendrites. The Roy lab is interested in mechanisms delivering somatically-synthesized proteins to their appropriate sites in axons and synapses, particularly the transport of soluble cargoes that is not well understood. Trafficking routes are also relevant for neurodegenerative diseases – such as amyloid trafficking in Alzheimer’s disease – and the lab is keen to clarify these mechanisms in neurons. More recently, the lab has been involved in harnessing gene-editing to therapeutically manipulate trafficking pathways in Alzheimer’s and other diseases.

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