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Dr. Ida Momennejad- TALK

Date:
December 19, 2018
Time:
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Event Category:
Seminars
Location:
Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Organizer:
Neurobiology and Behavior
Email:

Ida Momennejad, PhD

Princeton University

Title: Multi-scale Predictive Representations in Memory and Planning

Date: Wednesday, December 19th, 2018

Time: 10AM

Location: Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory

 

Abstract:

How does the brain build models of the world in order to predict and plan the future?  Tolman proposed cognitive maps that represent merely relationships between adjacent events in the environment.  When faced with a decision, the one-step cognitive map would be used to simulate various paths to reward ‘online’, step-by-step.  However, this proposal is computationally costly and inefficient for realistically large decision trees.  An alternative proposal is that an efficient model of the environment generalizes multi-step structural relationships among states or events.  Such a model can be updated by ‘offline’ memory processes; enabling fast and flexible planning.  I use reinforcement learning, behavioral experiments, fMRI, and electrophysiology in humans to study how the brain maps the world.  I show evidence that multi-step predictive representations, abstracted at multiple scales and updated via replay, govern planning behavior.  These multi-scale maps are supported by the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex, which also support non-spatial prospective memory and predictive representations.  I will briefly discuss ongoing work in human electrophysiology and computational psychiatry.  Taken together, this work suggests that multi-scale predictive representations may underlie memory, navigation, and planning.

Dr. James Antony- Talk

Date:
December 18, 2018
Time:
11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Event Category:
Seminars
Location:
Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Organizer:
Neurobiology and Behavior
Email:

James Antony, PhD

Princeton University

Title: How memories endure: memory reactivation during sleep and wake

Date: Tuesday, December 18th, 2018

Time: 11AM

Location: Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory

Abstract:

Memories change over time, as some of their features become weaker (forgetting) and others become stronger (consolidation). In this talk, I will investigate how long-term memory change is modulated by reactivation during sleep and wake. First, I will focus on a technique that involves presenting learning-related stimuli during sleep (termed targeted memory reactivation, or TMR). My findings show that TMR benefits memory retention for numerous types of memory. Crucially, they also point to a specific physiological process – the sleep spindle – that is essential for optimal memory reactivation during sleep. Next, I will present a theoretical framework that addresses how retrieval (vs. restudy) affects the neurobiological underpinnings of long-term memory; I will present results that support this framework as well as future plans for testing the framework. Last, I will discuss a separate line of work asking how individual episodes become abstracted into gist-based representations in a spatial domain, including results from a neuroimaging study that uses a virtual reality environment to reconstruct memory for locations. Cumulatively, these findings significantly contribute to understanding how reactivation benefits and shapes memory consolidation.

 

Dr. Elizabeth Chrastil- Talk

Date:
December 17, 2018
Time:
11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Event Category:
Seminars
Location:
Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Organizer:
Neurobiology and Behavior
Email:

Elizabeth Chrastil, PhD

University California, Santa Barbara

Title: Using spatial navigation to understand human learning and memory

 Date: Monday, December 17th, 2018

Time: 11AM

Location: Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory

Abstract:

Navigation is a central part of daily life. For some, getting around is easy, while others struggle, and certain clinical populations display wandering behaviors and extensive disorientation. Working at the interface between immersive virtual reality and neuroimaging techniques, my research uses these complementary approaches to inform questions about how we acquire and use spatial knowledge. In this talk, I will discuss both some of my recent work and upcoming experiments that center on three main themes: 1) how we learn new environments, 2) how the brain tracks spatial information, and 3) how individuals differ in their spatial abilities. More broadly, I will discuss how navigation lends insight into processes of human learning and memory. The behavioral and neuroimaging studies presented in this talk inform new frameworks for understanding spatial knowledge, leading to novel approaches to answering the next major questions in navigation, learning, and memory.

Dr. Subhojit Roy- TALK

Date:
December 14, 2018
Time:
11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Event Category:
Seminars
Location:
Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Organizer:
Neurobiology & Behavior, Pathology
Email:

SPECIAL SEMINAR

 Subhojit Roy, MD, PhD

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Title: Neuronal Trafficking in Physiology and Disease

Date: Friday, December 14th, 2018

Time: 11AM

Location: Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory

Abstract:  Due to their complex geometry and finite sites of bulk protein synthesis (perikarya), neurons have evolved elaborate transport and trafficking machineries to deliver proteins into axons and dendrites. The Roy lab is interested in mechanisms delivering somatically-synthesized proteins to their appropriate sites in axons and synapses, particularly the transport of soluble cargoes that is not well understood. Trafficking routes are also relevant for neurodegenerative diseases – such as amyloid trafficking in Alzheimer’s disease – and the lab is keen to clarify these mechanisms in neurons. More recently, the lab has been involved in harnessing gene-editing to therapeutically manipulate trafficking pathways in Alzheimer’s and other diseases.

Dr. Kristi Clark- Talk

Date:
December 12, 2018
Time:
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Event Category:
Seminars
Location:
Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Organizer:
Neurobiology and Behavior
Email:

Kristi Clark, PhD

University of Southern California

Title: High resolution mapping of hippocampal development: implications for big data applications

Date: Wednesday, December 12th, 2018

Time: 10AM

Location: Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory

 

Abstract:

In the non-human primate literature, there is evidence to suggest that the hippocampal formation is not fully developed at birth, but gradually develops during childhood, as individual subfields mature and are integrated into existing circuitry. Currently, the same level of detail is not known in humans. Recent technological advances in data acquisition and analytic techniques in neuroimaging make it possible to model the neurodevelopmental trajectory of the human hippocampus at much higher spatial resolution and with greater biological specificity than has ever been possible before. In this seminar, Dr. Clark will discuss her recent work in mapping both the macrostructural and microstructural properties of human hippocampal development and show how these techniques can be applied in the context of big data to develop preliminary methods of MR-based precision medicine.

Dr. David Clewett- TALK

Date:
December 07, 2018
Time:
11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Event Category:
Seminars
Location:
Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Organizer:
Neurobiology and Behavior
Email:

David Clewett, PhD

New York University

 

Title: Arousal mechanisms shape the selectivity and structure of episodic memory

Date: Friday, December 7th, 2018

Time: 11AM

Location: Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory

Abstract:

Memories are not arbitrary records of past events – they are highly selective. In particular, decades of research show that perception and memory tend to be biased towards emotionally arousing experiences, such as a car crash or the birth of a child. However, this focus on emotional representations has created critical blind spots in learning and memory research. Beyond simply enhancing processing of emotional stimuli, a surge in arousal also selectively influences which nearby information is committed to memory. Furthermore, spikes in arousal are happening all of the time and not just in response to emotional events. This suggests that physiological arousal might also be instrumental for organizing memories of everyday experiences. In this talk, I will describe behavioral, fMRI, and neurophysiological work showing that arousal and the release of neuromodulators, including norepinephrine and dopamine, may bias our memory systems to encode and consolidate meaningful neutral information. I will also discuss recent eye tracking work suggesting that fluctuations in arousal may help to transform continuous experience into memories of discrete events. Together, my lines of research suggest that, to truly understand memory, we must also understand how arousal mechanisms influence how and what we remember from past events.

 

Dr. Arielle Tambini Talk

Date:
November 28, 2018
Time:
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Event Category:
Seminars
Location:
Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Organizer:
Neurobiology and Behavior
Email:

Arielle Tambini, PhD

University of California, Berkeley

Title: Reactivation during awake rest: an opportunity for memory consolidation

Date: Wednesday, November 28th, 2018

Time: 10AM

Location: Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory

 

Abstract:

After events are initially encoded into memory, post-encoding mechanisms are thought to play a critical role in stabilizing representations of past experience. The reactivation of memory representations during ‘offline’ brain states is a major candidate mechanism thought to support long-term memory stabilization. In this talk, I will present evidence that reactivation during awake rest periods after learning supports subsequent memory in humans. I will first discuss evidence for the occurrence of endogenous memory reactivation during awake rest and that the strength of reactivation predicts later memory. I will then demonstrate that causal manipulations of awake memory reactivation directly influence subsequent memory retention, using approaches to both enhance (targeted memory reactivation) and impair memory consolidation (combined TMS-fMRI). Together, these findings suggest that awake rest periods after learning may play an important and under-appreciated role in supporting long-term memory consolidation and retention.

Dr. Alexander Smith- ICAN speaker

Date:
October 01, 2018
Time:
11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Event Category:
Seminars
Location:
Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Organizer:
Neurobiology and Behavior
Email:

ICAN SEMINAR
Monday, October 1st, 2018
11AM, Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory (Building 506 on the campus map)

Alexander Smith, Ph.D
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

“Biochemical and Genetic Regulation of Plasticity Underlying Cue-Induced Reinstatement”

Abstract:
Addiction is a major health concern, and preventing relapse is perhaps the most difficult aspect in providing treatment. Despite distinct pharmacological mechanisms of action, all addictive drugs produce similar behavioral endpoints, including relapse that can be induced by drug-associated cues. Similarly, while different classes of drugs produce differing, sometimes opposite, constitutive effects on brain physiology, relapse to all addictive drugs is characterized by transient synaptic potentiation of corticostriatal synapses in the nucleus accumbens core (NAcore). Thus, I propose that the most promising pharmacotherapeutic targets for prevention of relapse are those that are similarly altered across classes of drugs. In this seminar, I will present data showing that cue-induced reinstatement to heroin, cocaine, and nicotine each require activation of the extracellular matrix-remodeling enzyme MMP-9. I will then present unpublished work examining the regulation of cue-induced reinstatement, and MMP-9 activity by two microRNAs: miR-132 and miR-212. Finally, I will discuss plans for the near future to perform brain-wide examination of shared neurobiological substrates of opiate and psychostimulant relapse.

Alberto Lopez- Dissertation Defense 8/27/18 @3PM

Date:
August 27, 2018
Time:
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Event Category:
Dissertation
Location:
Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Organizer:
Neurobiology and Behavior
Email:

DEPARTMENT OF NEUROBIOLOGY & BEHAVIOR
Ph.D. DISSERTATION DEFENSE
****************************************
Alberto Lopez
Dr. Wood’s Lab

Epigenetic control of medial habenula function in cocaine-associated behaviors

 

Monday, August  27th, 2018
@3:00PM


Dale Melbourne Herklotz Conference Center, Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory

UC Irvine Center for Addiction Neuroscience Annual Symposium

Date:
June 12, 2018
Time:
7:45 am - 5:30 pm
Event Category:
Seminars
Location:
Crystal Cove Auditorium, UCI Conference Center, 4113 Pereira Drive, Irvine CA 92617
Organizer:
Neurobiology and Behavior
Email:

The Department of Neurobiology & Behavior and the School of Biological Sciences would like to cordially invite you to the annual UC Irvine Center for Addiction Neuroscience (ICAN) Symposium .

Space is limited, so please RSVP at your earliest convenience at http://irvinecan.com/registration/

As a quick reference, details of the symposium are below:

Event:                                 UC Irvine Center for Addiction Neuroscience (ICAN) Symposium

Date:                                   Tuesday, June 12, 2018

Time:                                  7:45am – 5:30pm

Location:                            Crystal Cove Auditorium, UCI Conference Center, 4113 Pereira Drive, Irvine CA 92617

Website:                             http://irvinecan.com/

Registration Deadline:    Friday, June 1st, 2018

 

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